Double-click to start typing

Nutrigenomic Health Consulting is now the 
Nutritional Genomics Institute. 
www.nutritionalgenomicsinstitute.com

Subtitle

Blog

Musings and Articles of Interest....

view:  full / summary

Glyphosate ( Roundup) and Glycine

Posted on July 19, 2016 at 2:35 PM

Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases III: Manganese, neurological diseases, and associated pathologies

Anthony Samsel and Stephanie Seneff1,*

Author information ► Article notes ► Copyright and License information ►

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.

Go to:

Abstract

Manganese (Mn) is an often overlooked but important nutrient, required in small amounts for multiple essential functions in the body. A recent study on cows fed genetically modified Roundup®-Ready feed revealed a severe depletion of serum Mn. Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup®, has also been shown to severely deplete Mn levels in plants. Here, we investigate the impact of Mn on physiology, and its association with gut dysbiosis as well as neuropathologies such as autism, Alzheimer's disease (AD), depression, anxiety syndrome, Parkinson's disease (PD), and prion diseases. Glutamate overexpression in the brain in association with autism, AD, and other neurological diseases can be explained by Mn deficiency. Mn superoxide dismutase protects mitochondria from oxidative damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction is a key feature of autism and Alzheimer’s. Chondroitin sulfate synthesis depends on Mn, and its deficiency leads to osteoporosis and osteomalacia. Lactobacillus, depleted in autism, depend critically on Mn for antioxidant protection. Lactobacillus probiotics can treat anxiety, which is a comorbidity of autism and chronic fatigue syndrome. Reduced gut Lactobacillus leads to overgrowth of the pathogen, Salmonella, which is resistant to glyphosate toxicity, and Mn plays a role here as well. Sperm motility depends on Mn, and this may partially explain increased rates of infertility and birth defects. We further reason that, under conditions of adequate Mn in the diet, glyphosate, through its disruption of bile acid homeostasis, ironically promotes toxic accumulation of Mn in the brainstem, leading to conditions such as PD and prion diseases.

Work Cited:

Samsel, A., & Seneff, S. (2015). Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases III: Manganese, neurological diseases, and associated pathologies. Surgical Neurology International, 6, 45. http://doi.org/10.4103/2152-7806.153876

The above is a detailed mechanism of manganese deficiency as a result of glyphosate exposure. Stephanie Seneff has further pioneered the idea from this article to a newer article describing the substituting properties of glyphosate for glycine resulting in a myriad of neuro-endocrine  and neuro-degenerative diseases. GLYphosate is after all a synthetic amino acid. It is also compelling to look at the trends of diseases(especially autism)  and the use of Monsanto's Roundup. There is a parallel corollary.

For those with SOD alterations, this issue could become especially salient. 

Ponderings for today....How do you feel about Glyphosate in Your Food?

Wait...could beer be good for you?

Posted on June 26, 2016 at 10:00 PM

Too bad I don't like beer!!!

"These data show that the hop extract and 6-PN preferentially enhance the nontoxic estrogen 2-hydroxylation pathway through AhR [aryl hydrocarbon receptor] mediated up-regulation of P450 1A1, which further emphasizes the importance of standardization of botanical extracts to multiple chemical markers for both safety and desired bioactivity,”

http://www.genengnews.com/public/genhighlight/item.aspx?id=81252867

The above article referenced the below research...

 

Chem Res Toxicol. 2016 Jun 22. [Epub ahead of print]

Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) Extract and 6-Prenylnaringenin Induce P450 1A1 Catalyzed Estrogen 2-Hydroxylation.

Wang S1, Dunlap TL1, Howell CE1, Mbachu OC1, Rue EA1, Phansalkar R1, Chen SN1, Pauli GF1, Dietz BM1, Bolton JL1.

Author information

Abstract

Humulus lupulus L. (hops) is a popular botanical dietary supplement used by women as a sleep aid and for postmenopausal symptom relief. In addition to its efficacy for menopausal symptoms, hops can also modulate the chemical estrogen carcinogenesis pathway and potentially protect women from breast cancer. In the present study, an enriched hop extract and the key bioactive compounds [6-prenylnarigenin (6-PN), 8-prenylnarigenin (8-PN), isoxanthohumol (IX), and xanthohumol (XH)] were tested for their effects on estrogen metabolism in breast cells (MCF-10A and MCF-7). The methoxyestrones (2-/4-MeOE1) were analyzed as biomarkers for the nontoxic P450 1A1 catalyzed 2-hydroxylation and the genotoxic P450 1B1 catalyzed 4-hydroxylation pathways, respectively. The results indicated that the hop extract and 6-PN preferentially induced the 2-hydroxylation pathway in both cell lines. 8-PN only showed slight up-regulation of metabolism in MCF-7 cells, whereas IX and XH did not have significant effects in either cell line. To further explore the influence of hops and its bioactive marker compounds on P450 1A1/1B1, mRNA expression and ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (EROD) activity were measured. The results correlated with the metabolism data and showed that hop extract and 6-PN preferentially enhanced P450 1A1 mRNA expression and increased P450 1A1/1B1 activity. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation by the isolated compounds was tested using xenobiotic response element (XRE) luciferase construct transfected cells. 6-PN was found to be an AhR agonist that significantly induced XRE activation and inhibited 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced XRE activity. 6-PN mediated induction of EROD activity was also inhibited by the AhR antagonist CH223191. These data show that the hop extract and 6-PN preferentially enhance the nontoxic estrogen 2-hydroxylation pathway through AhR mediated up-regulation of P450 1A1, which further emphasizes the importance of standardization of botanical extracts to multiple chemical markers for both safety and desired bioactivity.

PMID: 27269377 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


You know beer drinkers, they do make gluten free beer that is made with hops - it could be a win!


Thanks for peeking in on my trial blog post!

~Chrissie


Rss_feed